Does the Sound of Noisy Eating Drive You Mad? Here’s Why

If you’ve ever been tempted to confront someone slurping their soup in a restaurant, or if a person breathing loudly next to you in the movie theater is enough to make your blood boil, then you’re not alone: You’re one of many people suffering from a genuine brain abnormality called misophonia.

Misophonia, a disorder which means sufferers have a hatred of sounds such as eating, chewing, loud breathing or even repeated pen-clicking, was first named as a condition in 2001.

Over the years, scientists have been skeptical about whether or not it constitutes a genuine medical ailment, but now new research led by a team at the U.K.’s Newcastle University has proven that those with misophonia have a difference in their brain’s frontal lobe to non-sufferers.

In an report published in the journal Current Biology, scientists said scans of misophobia sufferers found changes in brain activity when a ‘trigger’ sound was heard. Brain imaging revealed that people with the condition have an abnormality in their emotional control mechanism which causes their brains to go into overdrive on hearing trigger sounds. The researchers also found that trigger sounds could evoke a heightened physiological response, with increased heart rate and sweating.

For the study, the team used an MRI to measure the brain activity of people with and without misophonia while they were listening to a range of sounds. The sounds were categorized into neutral sounds (rain, a busy café, water boiling), unpleasant sounds (a baby crying, a person screaming) and trigger sounds (the sounds of breathing or eating). When presented with trigger sounds, those with misophonia presented different results to those without the condition.

“I hope this will reassure sufferers,” Tim Griffiths, Professor of Cognitive Neurology at Newcastle University and UCL, said in a press release. “I was part of the skeptical community myself until we saw patients in the clinic and understood how strikingly similar the features are.”

“For many people with misophonia, this will come as welcome news as for the first time we have demonstrated a difference in brain structure and function in sufferers,” Dr Sukhbinder Kumar, from the Institute of Neuroscience at Newcastle University and the Wellcome Centre for NeuroImaging at University College London, added. “This study demonstrates the critical brain changes as further evidence to convince a sceptical medical community that this is a genuine disorder.”

DIY Homemade ‘Weight Loss Pills’

The only reason why I’m making this post is because of you. Yes, for women who still believe a single chemically produced pill will change your life forever.

Even my grandmother knew these commercials about the pills are here to take your money away. Nutrition and Exercises are the main things you need to develop in your fight against weight.

The pills you see on TV are probably working, but you will get your weight back as soon as you stop consuming them. You can’t buy them forever. I hate when women believe in such things. Seriously. Every time I’m in the mall looking for a piece of clothing, I see approximately 10 to 15 women asking for some weight loss pills. It’s really rude if I join in and attack the people who are selling those with my knowledge. That’s why I’ll address you all this way.

Before I share with you the method I found, let me say one thing. I’m against pills. I will always be. The food I eat every day is my pill for managing my personal weight. It takes time for you to change your opinion and habits. That’s why I found naturally made pills you can do all by yourself. There is nothing chemical in them and will prepare you to lose weight. I don’t know if they work. From what I can see, they have a great background. So, you should try them if you want to see whether there will be results or not.

The girl you will see on the video is Ela Gale. She is a huge fan of homemade weight loss pills. She says that the ingredients she uses for these pills are raising your metabolism while decreasing appetite. It seems legit.

So, what do you need for this recipe?

  • Cayenne pepper
  • Turmeric
  • Cinnamon

The whole process of making these pills is better explained in the video. You will be led through the process step-by-step.

Get the ingredients and see what Ela is making.

It seems very easy and inexpensive.

I know Ela warned you about the possible side effects of these pills, but I felt that I need to say it again.

Please be extremely careful with the whole process. These pills are here to work and HELP you with weight loss. They won’t do wonders. You still need to do your part exercising for reaching the goals.

One last thing, women who are allergic to these spices, please avoid these pills.

If you have IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) stay away from these pills, too.

This is only for a test. We have to be careful of it.

Share this with your friends and see what they will say about these natural and homemade pills.

Quick & Healthy Dinner: 20 Minute Honey Garlic Shrimp

Here we have a super simple honey garlic shrimp recipe, all done in the comfort of your skillet. It’s yummy, it’s healthy and so easy to make.

When I say super easy, I mean five ingredient easy and less than 15 minutes cooking time easy. Shrimp cooks so quickly, it’s such a great fast fix for any meal of the day.

I used jumbo peeled shrimp with tail on for these. They just tend to look better in pics. But you can use whatever kind of shrimp you like or can easily get your hands on.

We begin by making your honey garlic sauce which is basically just some honey, soy sauce, ginger and garlic. Tada! I wasn’t lying when I said simple.

Honey Garlic Shrimp Recipe:

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup soy sauce (I use reduced sodium)
  • 1 Tablespoon minced garlic
  • optional: 1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger
  • 1 lb medium uncooked shrimp, peeled & deveined1
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • optional: chopped green onion for garnish

Instructions

  1. Whisk the honey, soy sauce, garlic, and ginger (if using) together in a medium bowl.
  2. Place shrimp in a large zipped-top bag or tupperware. Pour 1/2 of the marinade mixture on top, give it all a shake or stir, then allow shrimp to marinate in the refrigerator for 15 minutes or for up to 8-12 hours. Cover and refrigerate the rest of the marinade for step 3. (Time-saving tip: while the shrimp is marinating, I steamed broccoli and microwaved some quick brown rice.)
  3. Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium-high heat. Place shrimp in the skillet. (Discard used marinade2.) Cook shrimp on one side until pink– about 45 seconds– then flip shrimp over. Pour in remaining marinade and cook it all until shrimp is cooked through, about 1 minute more.
  4. Serve shrimp with cooked marinade sauce and a garnish of green onion. The sauce is excellent on brown rice and steamed veggies on the side.

Doctor Explains How To Reverse Autism In Children

Acording to Dr. Nemechek, there is growing scientific evidence that an imbalance of intestinal bacteria called SIBO (Small Intestinal Bacterial Overgrowth) is responsible for triggering Autism.

Small numbers of bacteria live in the upper, small intestine with larger numbers of bacteria down in the colon. SIBO happens when colonic bacteria migrate up into the small intestine and cause symptoms.

SIBO symptoms include heartburn after particular foods such as tomatoes, spices, bell peppers, or lettuce. SIBO also causes IBS, anxiety, eczema, and it can trigger many autoimmune disorders or cause inflammatory pain in joints and muscles.

SIBO bacteria also produce a chemical called propionic acid. In autistic children, propionic acid levels are high. In animal studies, high propionic acid leads to the development of antisocial behaviors, increased sensitivity to sound, light, and touch, as well as gait abnormalities.

He claims to have successfully reversed the major features of Autism in small children by reversing SIBO and promoting brain recovery. He used a prebiotic fiber called inulin to fight SIBO. Inulin is a natural fiber found in onions, garlic, artichokes, and chicory root.

You can buy powdered inulin online. Dr. Nemechek prefers Fiber Choice gummies that can be found at local pharmacies and grocery stores. Remember, the first ingredient must be inulin.

2-4 inulin gummies a day often reverses SIBO propionic acid enough to allow a preschool age, non-verbal autistic child, to begin speaking within 4-6 weeks. This is equal to ¼ to ½ teaspoon of powdered inulin daily.

Children with Autism may have cerebral developmental delay or seizures from underlying neuroinflammation in the brain. His patients take 2 Nordic Omega-3 Fishies (made by Nordic Naturals), a dose of 600 mg of omega-3 fatty acids per day.

Omega-3 fatty acids reduce neuroinflammation and have been associated with significant reversal of delays and seizure activity. He said that have witnessed inulin fiber and high dose omega-3 put autism in near-complete remission in small children.

Kids older that 8 often require more effort to reverse SIBO, higher doses of DHA omega-3 fatty acids, and Autonomic Nervous System intervention to restore proper brain oxygen levels, cerebral blood pressure, and proper intestinal tract movement and function.

The brains of older kids have experienced prolonged SIBO and stress and take longer to show improvement, but He have seen significant progress in older kids as well.

Inulin fiber and Omega-3 fatty acids are from natural sources, are commonly consumed by most of us every day, and are available without prescription.

For Autistic children consistent anti-SIBO efforts and fish oil consumption will need to be daily and forever. The benefits are life changing.

This is some additional material that He posted about older kids.  

Probiotics may help some digestive issues some but depending on the type of bacteria they contain and can add to the problem in other ways. We know very little about how the bacteria within probiotic supplements behave within the environment of the small intestine.

Dr. Nemechek said that he have seen patients become more nauseated, depressed or develop arthritis as well as have skin conditions flair when they have added back their probiotics. Just because you don’t see an obvious side effect doesn’t mean the probiotic isn’t adding to the pro-inflammatory cytokine levels within the brain for instance.

So instead of adding living bacteria to the intestinal tract, He recommends a prebiotic fiber called inulin for young pediatric patients. Inulin is a fiber that can only be eaten by the healthy bacteria that normally inhabit the small intestine. As these bacteria grow in numbers, they excrete mild acids that the invading bacteria from the colon (the ones that are producing propionic acid) do not like. The invading bacteria are suppressed in numbers and retreat further down the intestinal tract towards the colon.

So, for younger (less than 10 years old) pediatric patients, use at least 600-1200 mg of omega-3 from Nordic Naturals Omega Fishies, and 2-4 Fiber Choice Fruity Bite Gummies (which contain inulin) or 1/4 – 1 tsp of powdered inulin mixed in food every day.

For older pediatric patients (older than 10), He have found the inulin may help some as well but but generally not enough. Older kids need a short course of a special antibiotic called Xifaxan (rifaximin), 550-600 mg twice daily for 10 days. The inulin is added after only if it seems to help with any remaining intestinal problems.

The dose of omega-3 from fish oil increases as well. At 10-years-old, He want them on about 2,000 mg of total omega-3 fatty acids and progressively increase this to 3,000 mg of the specific DHA component of omega-3 as kids become close to adult size.

A word of caution. Many fish oil capsules that say 1,000 mg or 1,200 mg are telling you there is that much FISH OIL per capsule NOT the total OMEGA-3 in each capsule. The packaging in my opinion seems to be deliberately misleading. You must look at the label on the back.

He said that when his patients are able to swallow capsules, He prefers the use a product from NOW Foods called DHA-500. These are made predominantly from sardines and anchovies and are very high in DHA, the only dietary omega-3 that significantly penetrates the brain. Each capsule contains 750 mg of omega-3 and I’ll have 10-year-olds take 3 per day and once they grow to the size of an adult or reach 18 years of age, I have them increase to 6 per day.

If they can’t or won’t swallow the fish oil capsules, He recommends Nordic Naturals ProOmega fish oil. Highly concentrated, and high quality.

Baking Soda to Reduce Belly Fat l How to lose weight using Baking Soda Recipes

Did you know that this simple ingredient can help you lose weight and reduce belly fat? In this article you can find three ways in which you can use baking soda to prepare the miraculous fat-burning drinks that have the ability to significantly reduce stomach fat and help you get a flat stomach.

How to use baking soda to reduce your abdominal fat:

Baking soda with apple cider vinegar

Ingredients:

  • 2 tbsps. of apple cider vinegar
  • 1 glass of water
  • ½ teaspoon of baking soda

Instructions:

Combine the ingredients in a glass and consume the mixture every morning before breakfast.

Baking soda and lemon juice or grapefruit

Ingredients:

  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 lemon or grapefruit
  • ½ glass of water

Instructions:

Mix the lemon juice or grapefruit juice with baking soda in a glass of water. Stir well to completely dissolve the ingredients. Consume the mixture on an empty stomach, 20 minutes before breakfast.

Baking soda with fruit

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups of water
  • 2 lemons
  • 1 cup of strawberries
  • 1 sprig of fresh mint leaves

Instructions:

Put all the ingredients in a blender and blend for 2 minutes. You can also add some ice. Consume 2 cup of the smoothie a day.

Extra tip: It is recommended that you add a tablespoon of cinnamon in the mixture since cinnamon stimulates weight loss.

Household Foods And Drinks That Are Deadly To Dogs

It’s hard to resist sharing food with your dog, especially when she looks up at you with those, well, puppy dog eyes. But, while some human snacks are safe in small doses, others are downright dangerous for dogs.

Puppies in particular are notorious for getting into things they shouldn’t, and they tend to operate on the assumption that everything is edible until proven otherwise.

If your little guy thinks it’s perfectly okay to eat that cardboard box, he won’t think twice about snacking on anything that you leave lying around!

So, keep Fido safe by making sure he never gets a chance to eat (or drink) any of the poisonous items below……

Alcohol

Most people know not to give alcoholic drinks to their pets; however, alcohol poisoning in pets is more common than you think! This is because alcohol can be found in surprising places. Rum-soaked fruitcake or unbaked dough containing yeast result in alcohol poisoning and other life-threatening problems. Unbaked bread dough will expand in the warm, moist environment of the stomach and can result in a bloated stomach (called “bloat”), which can then progress to a gastric-dilitation volvulus (GDV), which is a twisted stomach. Signs of GDV include vomiting, non-productive retching, a distended stomach, an elevated heart rate, weakness, collapse, and death. Secondly, when the yeast in the unbaked dough is fermented, it results in the production of carbon dioxide (causing the bloat) and alcohol. Alcohol from the fermenting yeast is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and results in alcohol poisoning quickly. Ingestion of alcohol can cause dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Intoxicated animals can experience seizures and respiratory failure.

Apricot

The seeds, leaves, and stems of the apricot tree contain cyanide. This toxin inhibits cytochrome oxidase, an enzyme necessary for cellular oxygen transport, preventing appropriate oxygen uptake by cells. When ingested in toxic amounts, clinical signs of dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, inadequate oxygen levels, bright red gums, shock, and death can be seen.

Australian Nut

Australian nuts, also known as Macadamia nuts, are derived from the Macadamia intergrifolia in the United States, and in Macadamia tetraphylla in Hawaii and Australia where they are cultivated. Symptoms start to appear within 3 to 12 hours of ingestion. Australian nuts are found to be more toxic to dogs than cats

Avocado

Avocado contains a toxin called persin, but despite the rumors, avocado is not poisonous to dogs, nor likely to cats. Only certain species are poisoned by persin. While dogs and cats don’t seem to be affected by persin, avocado poisoning can be deadly to birds and large animals (such as cattle). The bigger risk to dogs and cats is a foreign body obstruction, which can occur if the dog swallowed the whole large, round avocado seed; due to size alone, this seed can get stuck in the esophagus, stomach or intestinal tract of dogs.

Pet birds should never be fed avocado, as canaries, parakeets, cockatiels and large parrots are extremely susceptible to persin toxicity. Signs of persin poisoniong in birds includes the inability to perch, respiratory distress, fluid accumulation around the bird’s heart and lungs, liver and kidney failure, and sudden death.

If you suspect your pet has avocado poisoning, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for treatment advice.

Bread Dough

Unbaked bread dough can be poisonous to dogs and cats. When ingested, the unbaked bread dough expands in the warm, moist environment of the stomach and can result in a bloated stomach (called “bloat”); this can then progress to a gastric-dilatation volvulus (GDV), which is a twisted stomach. Signs of bloat or GDV include vomiting, non-productive retching, a distended stomach, an elevated heart rate, weakness, collapse, and death. Secondly, when the yeast in the unbaked dough is fermented, it results in the production of carbon dioxide (causing the bloat) and alcohol. Alcohol from the fermenting yeast is rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream and results in alcohol poisoning quickly. Ingestion of alcohol can cause dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Intoxicated dogs and cats can experience seizures and respiratory failure.

Caffeine

Humans continue to drink and use more and more caffeine, making pets more frequently exposed to this dangerous chemical. There are several sources of caffeine in the house: in coffee, coffee grounds, tea, soda, energy drinks, weightlifter supplements, OTC pills (e.g., NoDoz), and diet pills. Theobromine, a cousin chemical to caffeine is also found chocolate. Dogs and cats appear to be more sensitive to the effects of caffeine than people. While 1-2 laps of coffee, tea or soda will not contain enough caffeine to cause poisoning in most pets, the ingestion of moderate amounts of coffee grounds, tea bags or 1-2 diet pills can easily cause death in small dogs or cats. When ingested, clinical signs of hyperactivity, restlessness, vomiting, an elevated heart rate, hypertension (elevated blood pressure), abnormal heart rhythms, tremors, hyperthermia (elevated body temperature), seizures, collapse and death may be seen.

Cherry

Cherry trees and shrubs (Prunus sp) including the Choke cherry, Black cherry and cherry laurel contain cyanogenic glycosides. All parts of these plants other than the ripe pulp around the seeds are considered toxic and contain cyanide. Cyanide inhibits cytochrome oxidase, an enzyme necessary for cellular oxygen transport, preventing appropriate oxygen uptake by cells. When ingested in toxic amounts, clinical signs of dilated pupils, difficulty breathing, inadequate oxygen levels, bright red gums, shock, and death can be seen.

Chocolate

While the occasional chocolate chip within one cookie may not be an issue, we worry about certain types of chocolate – the less sweet and the darker the chocolate, the more toxic it is to your dog. Baker’s chocolate and dark chocolate pose the biggest problem. Other sources include chewable, flavored multi-vitamins, baked goods, or chocolate-covered espresso beans. The chemical toxicity is due to a methylxanthine (like theobromine and caffeine), and results in vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, inflammation of the pancreas (i.e., pancreatitis), an abnormal heart rhythm, seizures, and rarely, even death. Dogs make up 95% of all our chocolate calls, as cats are usually too discriminating to eat chocolate! In smaller dogs, even the wrappers from candy can result in a secondary obstruction in the stomach or intestines.

Currants

Grapes, raisins, and even currants (some currants are actually small, black grapes) are toxic to your dog! In fact, there have been anecdotal reports of cats and ferrets being affected by these also. Ingestion of even a small amount of grapes, raisins, or currants can result in severe, acute kidney failure. All types of grape- or raisin-containing products (including grape juice, trail mix, bagels, etc.) can result in this. Even organic, pesticide-free, grapes grown in home gardens can result in toxicity. Although the mechanism of action is not clearly understood on how grapes, raisins and currants are poisonous at this time, this common fruit can result in anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, and potentially severe acute renal failure (which develops several days later). The toxicity is not necessarily dose-dependent, and symptoms can occur with even small ingestions. Decontamination (e.g., inducing vomiting, decontaminating with activated charcoal, etc.), aggressive supportive care, aggressive IV fluid therapy, and kidney function (e.g., BUN/creatinine) monitoring is recommended.

If you suspect your pet ingested grapes, raisins, or currants, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline for treatment recommendations

Garlic

Onions, garlic, chives, and leeks are in the Allium family, and are poisonous to both dogs and cats if the dose is right. Garlic is considered to be about five times as toxic as onions for cats and dogs. Certain breeds and species seem to be more sensitive: Japanese breeds of dogs (e.g., Akita, Shiba Inu) and cats. Onion and garlic poisoning results in oxidative damage to the red blood cells (making the red blood cells more likely to rupture) and gastroenteritis (e.g., nausea, oral irritation, drooling, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea). Other clinical signs of anemia may be seen, and include lethargy, pale gums, an elevated heart rate, an increased respiratory rate, weakness, exercise intolerance, and collapse. Onion and garlic poisoning may have a delayed onset, and clinical signs may not be apparent for several days. While minute amounts of these foods in some pets, especially dogs, may be safe, large ingestions can be very toxic.

If you suspect your dog or cat have onion poisoning or garlic poisoning, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline for treatment recommendations.

Grapes

Grapes, raisins, and even currants (some currants are actually small, black grapes) are toxic to your dog! In fact, there have been anecdotal reports of cats and ferrets being affected by these also. Ingestion of even a small amount of grapes, raisins, or currants can result in severe, acute kidney failure. All types of grape- or raisin-containing products (including grape juice, trail mix, bagels, etc.) can result in this. Even organic, pesticide-free, grapes grown in home gardens can result in toxicity. Although the mechanism of action is not clearly understood on how grapes, raisins and currants are poisonous at this time, this common fruit can result in anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, and potentially severe acute renal failure (which develops several days later). The toxicity is not necessarily dose-dependent, and symptoms can occur with even small ingestions. Decontamination (e.g., inducing vomiting, decontaminating with activated charcoal, etc.), aggressive supportive care, aggressive IV fluid therapy, and kidney function (e.g., BUN/creatinine) monitoring is recommended.

If you suspect your pet ingested grapes, raisins, or currants, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline for treatment recommendations.

Hops

Humulus lupulus, commonly known as hops, is a plant used in the process of brewing beer. As home brewing increases in popularity, more dogs may be at risk for exposure. Hops plugs (which typically are dried) tend to be more toxic than hops pellets. The exact toxic principle is unknown, but may be related to essential oils, resins, phenolic compounds, or nitrogenous constituents within the plant. When ingested by dogs (or rarely, cats), signs of hop poisoning include malignant hyperthermia (with temperatures exceeding 105⁰F/40.6⁰C), increased breathing, a racing heart rate, anxiety, vomiting, abnormal clotting, and even death. Death has been reported in dogs poisoned by hops within 6 hours of ingestion (without treatment). Any breed of dog may be affected, but breeds predisposed to malignant hyperthermia (e.g., greyhounds, Labrador retrievers, Saint Bernards, pointers, Dobermans, Border collies, English springer spaniels, and northern breeds) are at higher risk for toxicity.

Macadamia Nuts

The Macadamia tree is a member of the Protaceae family. The nut is typically cultivated from the Macadamia integrifolia and Macadamia tetraphylla trees. Depending on the amount ingested, clinical signs of severe lethargy, increased body temperature, vomiting, tremors, joint stiffness, and inability to walk (commonly hind limb) may be seen. The toxic mechanism is unknown but can effect nerve function (specifically, the motor neurons, neuromuscular junctions, muscle fibers or neurotransmitters).

Moldy Food (Mycotoxins)

Ingestion of moldy food from the garbage or a compost pile puts dogs, cats, and even wildlife at risk for toxicity due to tremorgenic mycotoxins. These toxins may be found in moldy bread, pasta, cheese, nuts, or other decaying matter like compost. Clinical signs include vomiting, agitation, walking drunk, tremors, seizures, and severe secondary hyperthermia. Signs may persist from hours to days, but typically resolve within 24-48 hours with aggressive veterinary treatment.

Mushrooms

There are several thousand species of mushrooms located throughout the United States, but only a small percentage is considered toxic. As accurate mushroom identification can be difficult, it should be left to experts (mycologists). While the majority of mushrooms are considered non-toxic, some may result in severe clinical signs (even death). The majority of confirmed fatal mushroom toxicities in pets are secondary to mushrooms from the following genera: Amanita, Galerina, and Lepiota. Depending on the type/species of mushroom ingested, several general organ systems can be affected: hallucinogenic (e.g., visual disturbances), gastrointestinal (e.g., vomiting, diarrhea), central nervous system (e.g., ataxia, tremors, seizures, death), liver failure (e.g., vomiting, black-tarry stool, increased liver function blood tests, etc.), kidney failure failure (e.g., halitosis, anorexia, vomiting, inappropriate thirst or urination), etc.

In general, all mushroom ingestions in veterinary patients should be considered toxic unless accurate, rapid mushroom identification can occur. Clinical signs from mushroom poisoning are dependent on the species of mushroom ingested, the specific toxin within that mushroom, and the individual’s own susceptibility. Early clinical signs include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, walking drunk, depression, tremors, and seizures, with liver and renal damage occurring later.

If you see your dog eat a mushroom, contact your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for treatment advice.

Onions

Onions, garlic, chives, and leeks are of the Allium family, and are poisonous to both dogs and cats. Garlic is considered to be about 5X as potent as onions. Certain breeds and species seem to be more sensitive: Japanese breeds of dogs (e.g., Akita, Shiba Inu) and cats. Onion and garlic poisoning results in oxidative damage to the red blood cells (making the red blood cells more likely to rupture) and gastroenteritis (e.g., nausea, oral irritation, drooling, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea). Other clinical signs of anemia may be seen, and include lethargy, pale gums, an elevated heart rate, an increased respiratory rate, weakness, exercise intolerance, and collapse. Onion and garlic poisoning may have a delayed onset, and clinical signs may not be apparent for several days.

If you suspect your dog or cat have onion poisoning or garlic poisoning, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline for treatment recommendations.

Play Dough (Homemade)

Homemade play dough, which is often made by parents as toys for their children, is generally comprised of food coloring and salt. When accidentally ingested by dogs or cats, homemade play dough is quite toxic, resulting in salt poisoning. Other sources of salt poisoning in dogs and cats include rock salt (for de-icers), paint balls, table salt, sea water, enemas (containing sodium phosphate), etc.

Salt poisoning in dogs and cats results in clinical signs of vomiting, diarrhea, inappetance, lethargy, walking drunk, abnormal fluid accumulation within the body, excessive thirst or urination, potential injury to the kidneys, tremors, seizures, coma, and even death when untreated. Treatment for salt poisoning includes careful administration of IV fluids, electrolyte monitoring, treatment for dehydration and brain swelling, and supportive care.

If you think your dog or cat ingested homemade play dough, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for life-saving treatment advice.

Raisins

Grapes, raisins, and even currants (some currants are actually small, black grapes) are toxic to your dog! In fact, there have been anecdotal reports of cats and ferrets being affected by these also. Ingestion of even a small amount of grapes, raisins, or currants can result in severe, acute kidney failure. All types of grape- or raisin-containing products (including grape juice, trail mix, bagels, etc.) can result in this. Even organic, pesticide-free, grapes grown in home gardens can result in toxicity. Although the mechanism of action is not clearly understood on how grapes, raisins and currants are poisonous at this time, this common fruit can result in anorexia, vomiting, diarrhea, and potentially severe acute renal failure (which develops several days later). The toxicity is not necessarily dose-dependent, and symptoms can occur with even small ingestions. Decontamination (e.g., inducing vomiting, decontaminating with activated charcoal, etc.), aggressive supportive care, aggressive IV fluid therapy, and kidney function (e.g., BUN/creatinine) monitoring is recommended.

If you suspect your pet ingested grapes, raisins, or currants, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline for treatment recommendations.

Salt

Salt, while commonly used for cooking in the kitchen, is quite poisonous to dogs and cats. The use of salt to induce vomiting in dogs and cats is no longer the standard of care and is not recommended for use by pet owners or veterinarians! Other sources of salt can be found throughout the household: in homemade play dough, rock salt (for de-icers), paint balls, table salt, sea water, enemas (containing sodium phosphate), etc.

Salt poisoning in dogs and cats results in clinical signs of vomiting, diarrhea, inappetance, lethargy, walking drunk, abnormal fluid accumulation within the body, excessive thirst or urination, potential injury to the kidneys, tremors, seizures, coma, and even death when untreated. Treatment for salt poisoning includes careful administration of IV fluids, electrolyte monitoring, treatment for dehydration and brain swelling, and supportive care.

If you think your dog or cat have been poisoned by salt, call your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for life-saving treatment advice.

Star Fruit

Soluble oxalate-containing plants contain oxalic acid and oxalate salts, and must be differentiated from insoluble oxalate plants (which are less toxic). Examples of soluble calcium oxalate-containing plants include: star fruit, common or garden rhubarb, shamrock plant, etc. In general, soluble calcium oxalate poisoning is more commonly associated with large animals (from livestock chronically grazing). However, when ingested in large enough quantities in small animals, it can result in poisoning in dogs, cats, and even humans.

Soluble calcium oxalates are present in varying degrees in all parts of the plant. For example, rhubarb stems are edible, but the leaves are not. When soluble oxalate salts are absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract, they bind with body’s calcium, resulting in a sudden drop in calcium. Rarely, acute renal failure can be seen from ingestion of plants or fruit containing these soluble oxalate crystals. Clinical signs of this type of poisoning include drooling, inappetance, vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, weakness, tremors, bloody urine, and changes in thirst and urination.

Xylitol

Xylitol is a natural, sugar-free sweetener commonly found in many chewing gums, mints, foods (e.g., pudding and gelatin snacks, etc.), oral rinses, toothpastes, and OTC supplements (e.g., sugar-free multivitamins, fish oils, etc.). The xylitol content of these products can vary widely depending on brand and flavor. In dogs, smaller ingestions can cause an acute, life-threatening low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) within 10-15 minutes. Larger ingestions can result in acute liver necrosis and liver failure. Signs of xylitol poisoning in dogs include weakness, lethargy, collapse, vomiting, tremoring, seizures, jaundice, malaise, black-tarry stool, and even coma or death. If you suspect your dog ingested xylitol, contact your veterinarian or Pet Poison Helpline immediately for life-saving treatment recommendations. Depending on the symptoms in your dog, vomiting may be induced by your veterinarian. Treatment includes monitoring of blood sugar and liver values, IV fluids, sugar supplementation in IV fluids, and liver protective drugs [e.g., S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe)], as needed. Activated charcoal does not reliably bind xylitol, therefore is not recommended. Blood work (evaluating liver function) should be re-evaluated 2-3 days after discharge, depending on the toxic dose ingested.

The 10 Day Detox Diet Plan For Weight Loss And Wellbeing

This healthy 10-day detox diet plan really works – it’s a simple detox programme that’s easy to follow and tasty too! Created by Dr. Mark Hyman, founder and medical director of the UltraWellness Center, it’s also a reliable and safe way to lose weight sensibly.

This ten-day healthy detox programme is different because Dr. Mark knows that it needs to fit into our lives without making us feel too deprived.

‘So many of the plans you come across in magazines and books include a two-day or weekend detox,’ says Dr. Mark . ‘My view on these short detoxes is that they just don’t give your body enough time for the good work to start properly, meaning that your system gets confused. In order to achieve long-lasting (even remarkable results), the programme you follow has to last between seven and ten days. Only after this longer period will your great work take root. Let it encourage you to slow down, rest, get rid of bad habits and enjoy.’

Who will a healthy detox plan work for?

Anyone who experiences some of the following symptoms will benefit from undergoing a detox programme. The more symptoms you experience, the more a detox plan will work for you.

– age spots
– bad breath
– digestive problems
– excess weight
– headaches
– mood swings
– tiredness
– skin disorders
– dull skin and hair
– sluggish metabolism.

Once you’ve completed your detox diet plan, your body will feel and look great – and people will notice! It’s possible to lose up to 10lb in 10 days but it depends on your age, your genetic makeup, your biological sex, if you’ve had relatively more or less body fat and for how long, what medications you’re taking, and so on.

The 10-­Day Detox Diet Meal Plan

Breakfast: Dr. Hyman’s Whole Food Protein Shake

This shake will power you through the hardest and longest of days. It is 100% whole, fresh, real food, with a spotlight on healthy fats and potent antioxidants from the blueberries.

  • 1/2 cup frozen wild blueberries
  • 1/2 cup frozen cranberries
  • 1/4 lemon with rind (optional)
  • 1 tbsp almond butter
  • 1 tbsp pumpkin seeds
  • 1 tbsps chia seeds
  • 1 tbsp hemp seeds
  • 2 walnuts
  • 1/4 avocado
  • 1/2 tbsp extra-­‐virgin coconut butter
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened almond milk
  • 1/2 cup water

Combine all of the ingredients in a blender. Blend on high speed until smooth, about 2 minutes. If the shake is too thick, add more water until you reach a thick but drinkable consistency. Makes one shake.

Lunch: Dr. Hyman’s Super Salad Bar

  • Choose a green base: arugula, spinach or mixed salad greens
  • Choose three vegetables: red, green or orange bell pepper, celery, mushroom, snap peas, jicama, carrots, radish, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, onion, roasted peppers, artichoke hearts, parsley, dill, cilantro, mint.
  • Choose one healthy fat: 1/4 avocado, 2 tablespoons nuts or seeds (walnuts, almonds, pumpkin or sunflower seeds), 2 tablespoons olives (Kalamata)
  • Choose one serving protein (4 ounces): salmon, sardines or shrimp (wild fresh or canned), diced chicken or turkey, cubed tofu or tempeh
  • Choose your dressing: 2 tablespoons tahini with lemon juice, 1 tablespoon olive oil with lemon juice or apple cider vinegar

Dinner: Nourishing Entrees with Aromatic Greens

  • Choose a green base: Broccoli, asparagus, arugula, spinach, kale or chard. Steam or lightly sauté with some garlic and oil.
  • Add 4-­‐6 ounces of protein (choose from below)

Protein Options:

Chicken, turkey, salmon, shrimp, scallops, grass-­‐fed meat, canned salmon, sardines or herring, hard boiled omega-­‐3 eggs, tofu or tempeh.

Snacks: Quick Creamy or Nutty Snacks

  • Choose either: Creamy tahini, hummus or tapenade with sliced raw veggies of choice (see salad bar options for ideas)
  • Or: 1/4 cup mixed nuts (raw if possible) like almonds or walnuts.

The 10-­Day Detox Diet Meal Plan Allowances

Unlimited NonStarchy Vegetables Allowed:

Arugula, artichoke, mushrooms, Swiss chard, asparagus, dandelion greens, mustard greens, tomatoes, bean sprouts, eggplant, onions, turnip greens, beet greens, endive, parsley, watercress, bell peppers (yellow, red or green), fennel, radishes, celery, broccoli, garlic, radicchio, chives, Brussels sprouts, ginger root, snap beans, collard greens, cabbage, green beans, snow peas, jalapeno peppers, cauliflower, hearts of palm, shallots, kale, summer squash, zucchini, spinach and lettuce.

Approved to cook & season meals with:

Coconut oil, olive oil, nut butters, nuts & seeds (hemp, chia, flax, pumpkin & sesame), coconut milk, unsweetened almond milk, balsamic vinegar & apple cider vinegar, low-­‐sodium vegetable broth, Dijon mustard, sea salt & black pepper, turmeric, cayenne, thyme, rosemary, chili powder, cumin, sage, oregano, onion powder, cinnamon, coriander, cilantro, paprika and parsley.

Christie Brinkley’s Diet Plan

Christie Brinkley may be 62 but she looks 30 years younger. What’s her secret? The former Sports Illustrated swimsuit model credits her fabulous looks to a vegetarian diet.

Brinkley doesn’t eat any meat in her day-to-day diet, avoiding butter, milk, and eggs. In fact, Brinkley has been a vegetarian since she was 13-years-old. She says that it was her love for animals (not health concerns) that made her give up animal products.

However, her vegetarian diet allowed her to avoid eating meat from animals that have been injected with growth hormones and antibiotics.

While Brinkley is a vegetarian and eats some animal products occasionally, she says her regular diet is almost vegan.

Vegetarian and vegan diets can be great for our health, as they avoid processed and fatty foods. Eating too much red meat has been linked to cardiovascular health problems, while processed meats are thought to contribute to cancer.

While Brinkley considers herself a vegetarian, she does allow herself cheat days once in a while. Over the years, she’s eaten fish, and while she’s cut that out now, she still enjoys the occasional oyster. However, by keeping her diet free of animal products most of time, Brinkley can still reap the health benefits.

So if you love animals, follow Christie Brinkley’s diet plan, it may have big benefits for your appearance and health. It’s a simple eating plan that can be used by anyone, and it helps you pack in nutrients.

DAY 1

  • BREAKFAST: Vanilla chia pudding with 1 cup fresh berries
  • LUNCH: Crunchy red cabbage and green apple sesame slaw with 1 cup steamed, cubed sweet potato (or 1 small sweet potato, baked)
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: 1/4 cup hemp hummus with fresh vegetables (carrots, celery, romaine leaves, bell pepper, etc.)
  • DINNER: Black bean and quinoa salad with quick cumin dressing
  • DESSERT: Dark chocolate

DAY 2

  • BREAKFAST: Smoothie with 1 cup almond milk, 1 large frozen banana, 1-2 tablespoons almond butter, 1 serving of protein powder, and a heaping cup of leafy greens (spinach, chard, kale, etc.)
  • LUNCH: 1 brown rice tortilla (Food For Life brand) or two gluten free corn tortillas with 1/4 cup hemp hummus, fresh or roasted red bell pepper, sliced cucumbers, and a handful of greens. Serve with steamed vegetables as desired, or a small side salad.
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: Protein bar
  • DINNER: Zucchini Pasta with Cherry Tomatoes, Sweet Potato, Basil, and Hemp “Parmesan”
  • DESSERT: Banana soft serve

DAY 3

  • BREAKFAST: Quinoa breakfast porridge with 1 cup fresh berries
  • LUNCH: Large salad with at least three cups of greens, whichever veggies you like, 3 tablespoons pumpkin or hemp seeds, and a dressing of choice (from the dressing options in the recipe index).
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: 4 tablespoons hemp hummus with fresh vegetables (carrots, celery, romaine leaves, bell pep-per, etc.)
  • DINNER: Small baked sweet potato (instructions below) with a tablespoon of melted coconut oil, half a cup of organic black beans, and steamed greens as desired (or a fresh side salad)
  • DESSERT: 2 raw brownie bites

DAY 4

  • BREAKFAST: 22 Days Peanut Butter & Chocolate Chip Nirvana bar, fresh fruit salad as desired
  • LUNCH: Golden harvest kale salad with 1/2 cup organic chickpeas
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 oz. almonds and a few tablespoons raisins
  • DINNER: Quick white bean and summer vegetable pasta (prepare with quinoa or brown rice pasta)
  • DESSERT: 2 raw vegan vanilla macaroons

DAY 5

  • BREAKFAST: Smoothie with 1 cup almond milk, 1 cup frozen blueberries, 1 serving chocolate Nutrition protein, 3 tablespoons of hemp seeds, and 1 cup leafy greens of choice
  • LUNCH: Leftover white bean and summer vegetable pasta or a large green salad with half a cup of beans or lentils, two tablespoons sliced almonds, vegetables of your choosing, and turmeric tahini dressing
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: Apple with 2 tablespoons almond butter
  • DINNER: Butternut squash curry served over 1/2 cup cooked quinoa, steamed vegetables as desired
  • DESSERT: Dark chocolate

DAY 6

  • BREAKFAST: Banana and almond butter oats (recipe to follow)
  • LUNCH: Smoky avocado and jicama salad
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: 1 cup almond milk blended with 22 Days Nutrition protein powder and a few ice cubes
  • DINNER: Black bean and corn burgers, served with a small salad or steamed vegetables
  • DESSERT: 2 raw vegan vanilla macaroons

DAY 7

  • BREAKFAST: Smoothie of 1/2 frozen banana, 1 cup frozen peaches, 2 ice cubes, 3/4 cup almond milk, 1 cup leafy greens, and 1 serving vanilla protein powder
  • LUNCH: Leftover black bean and corn burger, small salad
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: 1/4 cup vegan trail mix of choice (or 2 tbsp raw almonds or cashews and 2 tbsp dried fruit)
  • DINNER: 1 cup cooked quinoa, brown rice, or millet, served with 1/2 chopped avocado, 1 cup steamed greens, and dressing of choice (from dressing options in recipe index).
  • DESSERT: 1/2 cup chocomole

DAY 8

  • BREAKFAST: Gluten free banana pancakes, served with 1 cup fresh berries
  • LUNCH: Mango, kale, and avocado salad
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: Apple, banana, melon, berries, or any other fresh fruit of choice
  • DINNER: Eggplant rollatini with cashew cheese, steamed greens or broccoli as desired
  • DESSERT: Dark chocolate

DAY 9

  • BREAKFAST: Apple cinnamon oatmeal
  • LUNCH: Roasted butternut squash and apple soup, served with a fresh green salad or steamed veggies as desired
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: Protein bar
  • DINNER: Raw zucchini alfredo with basil and cherry tomatoes, served with fresh salad or steamed vegetables as desired
  • DESSERT: 2 raw vegan brownie bites

DAY 10

  • BREAKFAST: Smoothie of 1 cup frozen blueberries or mixed berries, 1 cup coconut water, 1/2 small avocado, 1 serving chocolate protein powder, and a dash of cinnamon.
  • LUNCH: Easy curried yellow lentils with avocado croutons
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: Fresh vegetable crudites with 1/4 cup hemp hummus
  • DINNER: Black bean and quinoa salad with quick cumin dressing
  • DESSERT: 1/2 cup chocomole

DAY 11

  • BREAKFAST: 1 sliced banana with 1 cup organic puffed rice or millet cereal (I like Arrowhead Mills brand) and 1 cup almond milk
  • LUNCH: Kale Salad with Apples, Raisins, and Creamy Curry Dressing
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: 1/4 cup raw trail mix of choice
  • DINNER: Sweet Potato Lime Burgers, fresh salad or steamed vegetables as desired
  • DESSERT: 2 raw vanilla macaroons

DAY 12

  • BREAKFAST: Vanilla chia pudding with 1 cup fresh berries
  • LUNCH: Red quinoa, almond, and arugula salad with cantaloupe
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: A couple of raw peanut butter & jelly snack balls
  • DINNER: Sweet potato and black bean chili with steamed broccoli or greens
  • DESSERT: 1/2 cup chocomole

DAY 13

  • BREAKFAST: Smoothie of 1 frozen banana, 1/2 cup frozen mango, 1 heaping cup spinach leaves, 1 cup coconut water, and 1/2 avocado
  • LUNCH: Bowl of leftover black bean and sweet potato chili with small salad or steamed greens
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: nutrition bar of choice
  • DINNER: Cauliflower “rice” with lemon, mint, and pistachios, served over fresh greens
  • DESSERT: Spicy almond milk hot chocolate

DAY 14

  • BREAKFAST: Banana and almond butter oats
  • LUNCH: Carrot avocado bisque with spicy Thai salad
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: Raw vegetable crudités with sweet potato hummus
  • DINNER: Brown rice and lentil salad, served with fresh salad or steamed vegetables as desired and dressing of choice
  • DESSERT: 2 raw vanilla macaroons

DAY 15

  • BREAKFAST: Strawberry ginger chia pudding
  • LUNCH: Leftover brown rice and lentil salad, served with a large mixed vegetable salad and dressing of choice from recipe index.
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: 2 peanut butter and jelly snack balls
  • DINNER: Raw “peanut” noodles with steamed vegetables or fresh salad as desired
  • DESSERT: Dark chocolate

DAY 16

  • BREAKFAST: Smoothie with 1 cup almond milk, 1 large frozen banana, 1-2 tablespoons almond butter, 1 serving of protein powder, and a heaping cup of leafy greens (spinach, chard, kale, etc.)
  • LUNCH: Mango, kale and avocado salad
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: Vegetable crudités as desired and 1/4 cup hemp hummus
  • DINNER: Easy un-fried brown rice and vegetables
  • DESSERT: 2 raw, vegan brownie bites

DAY 17

  • BREAKFAST: Banana breakfast wraps
  • LUNCH: Brown rice tortilla “pizza” and a side salad
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: Nutrition bar
  • DINNER: Arugula salad with roasted acorn squash, goji berries, and cauliflower
  • DESSERT: Banana soft serve

DAY 18

  • BREAKFAST: Apple cinnamon oatmeal
  • LUNCH: Fennel, avocado, and tomato salad with 1/2 cup chickpeas or white beans
  • SNACK: 1 cup almond milk blended with Protein Powder
  • DINNER: Roasted vegetable pesto pasta salad
  • DESSERT: Dark chocolate

DAY 19

  • BREAKFAST: Gluten free, vegan pumpkin muffins with a tablespoon of almond butter and an apple
  • LUNCH: Kale Salad with Apples, Raisins, and Creamy Curry Dressing; 1 cup roasted cauliflower and parsnip soup
  • SNACK: 1/3 cup raw trail mix of choice (or a mix of raw almonds and raisins or goji berries)
  • DINNER: Raw marinated portobello mushroom “steak” and cauliflower “mashed potatoes,” served with steamed greens or broccoli
  • DESSERT: Blueberry ginger ice cream

DAY 20

  • BREAKFAST: Smoothie of 1 cup frozen blueberries or mixed berries, 1 cup coconut water, 1/2 small avocado, 1 serving Chocolate protein powder, and a dash of cinnamon
  • LUNCH: Easy curried yellow lentils with avocado “croutons,” served with a salad and dressing of choice or steamed vegetables as desired
  • SNACK: Celery sticks served with 2 tablespoons of peanut or almond butter and raisins (“ants on a log” style)
  • DINNER: Dinner salad of raw greens and vegetables of choosing, 1 cup cooked sweet potato, 1/2 avocado, cubed, 1/2 cup cooked lentils, and a dressing of choice from the recipe index.
  • DESSERT: 2 raw, vegan brownie bites

DAY 21

  • BREAKFAST: 1 sliced banana and fresh berries with 1 cup organic puffed rice or millet cereal  and 1 cup almond milk
  • LUNCH: Smoky avocado and jicama salad, 1 small apple if desired
  • AFTERNOON SNACK: 2 peanut butter and jelly snack balls
  • DINNER: Quinoa enchiladas
  • DESSERT: Dark chocolate

DAY 22

  • BREAKFAST: Smoothie of 1 frozen banana, 1/2 cup frozen mango, 1 heaping cup spinach leaves, 1 cup coconut water, and 1/2 avocado
  • LUNCH: Leftover quinoa enchilada, side salad with dressing of choice
  • SNACK: Nutrition bar of choice
  • DINNER: Arugula salad with roasted acorn squash, goji berries, and cauliflower
  • DESSERT: 2 raw vegan vanilla macaroons

RECIPE INDEX

Below are the recipes for making the meals

BREAKFAST

LUNCH

DINNER

Police Are Warning People About The New “Can You Hear Me” Scam

“Can you hear me?” It is a simple question, but police say answering it could make you the victim of a scam.

Police in Virginia are now warning about the scam, which has also been recently reported in Florida, and, in 2016, in Pennsylvania.

“Anytime you become victim to a crime, you just feel violated,” said Officer Jo Ann Hughes with the Norfolk Police Department.

Here’s how it works – police say you’ll receive a phone call from a number you do not know.

“Usually it has a familiar area code,” Hughes told KTLA sister station WTKR, making the potential victim more likely to answer the call.

Police say after you answer the phone, a person – or automated recording – on the other end of the line introduces themselves and their business.

“That kind of warms you up,” Hughes said.

After the introduction comes the question, “Can you hear me?”

“All of us, our natural response is to say, ‘Yes,’ or ‘Sure,’ or ‘Yes I can,’” said Hughes, but she says this is exactly what you do not want to do.

Police say scammers record your “yes” response. In one variation of the scam documented by the Better Business Bureau in October 2016, the criminals may pretend to be from a cruise line or home security company and will later bill you for products or services you never asked for.

If you try to deny the charges, the scammers will playback your verbal confirmation “yes” and threaten to take legal action if you don’t pay.

In another variation, scammers may use the recording to authorize charges on a stolen credit card or with a utility company by tricking an automated system, according to CBS News. The con artists may have already stolen other personal information through a data breach that would allow them to pass the security checks.

“A lot of times, victims do not want to come forward because they are embarrassed. They feel like, ‘It was my fault. I should have known better,’ and they are just embarrassed by it all together. So we do not get a whole lot of reports, unfortunately,” said Hughes.

Los Angeles Times business columnist David Lazarus told that he got one of these calls last week.

“The call that I got, it sounded like a woman was calling. … She was bobbling her headset, and she said, ‘I’m sorry, I couldn’t get my headset on. Can you hear me?’” Lazarus said.

“What law enforcement and consumer advocates want you to know is: If it sounds like somebody is trying to get you to say ‘yes’ to something … Careful, don’t say anything,” Lazarus said.

Often the scam caller is actually a recording, he said.

Police say to avoid this scam, follow this advice.

    1. Do not answer the phone from numbers you do not recognize.
    2. Do not give out personal information.
    3. Do not confirm your number over the phone.
    4. Do not answer questions over the phone.

And finally this piece of advice: Hang up the phone and call police instead.

“We really want people to hear this,” said Hughes. “Say, ‘Look, I just heard about this scam on TV’ … and to hang up.”

MIRACLE: Teenager Survives On His Own For Almost 6 Hours With No Wi-Fi

IN what has been hailed as ‘a miracle’, one teenager has reportedly survived in his home with no connection to the internet for almost 6 whole hours.

Answering to the name ‘David Gowan’, the 16-year-old was found in a distressed state yesterday evening, walking through a Dungarvan neighbourhood holding his Samsung Galaxy above his head looking for a signal and muttering incoherently.

The emergency services were notified and David was brought to a nearby Starbucks and hooked up to their Wi-Fi immediately. It remains unclear as to how the teen was left without internet for such a long period of time, and a search has begun to find David’s parents, with fears that they may have other kids without even a single bar of coverage.

“David survived without access to any social media or video sharing sites for the better part of an afternoon,” said an amazed member of Waterford’s child protection services.

“No GIFs, no memes, no porn. It’s incredible to see him in such good condition, considering what he went through. There’s grown adults who can’t go without internet for that long, let alone teenagers. God love him like, he didn’t even see the new Star Wars trailer yet”.

David was not available for interview, with rumours circulating that the poor youngster had lost the ability to speak in anything other than normal English, having not used emojis for so long.

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